Plastic-eating bacteria

25th December 2018

Translated from the original article in Catalan.

Plastic ocean

We humans are destroying the planet Earth. Besides climate change (there are still ignorant people who do not believe it), the depletion of natural resources and the massive extinction of animal and plant species, one of the most visual effects is the coverage of the planet with rubbish. Since 71% of the surface is marine, most of the non-degrading waste finishes in the sea. In the oceans there are already large expansions covered by floating debris, especially plastics, called “plastic islands” (Figure 1). In the North Pacific area, where different sea currents come together, the “island” reaches 1500 km of radius, with plastics up to 200 meters deep, and continues to grow. There is more information of it, and also about the environmental consequences, in the Wikipedia article Great Pacific garbage patch.

F1 great-pacific-garbage-patch

Figure 1. Small portion of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (From oceanandreserveconservationalliance.com)

 

PET plastics

Although there are many types of plastics, one of the most used and most abundant in waste and “plastic islands” is polyethylene terephthalate, known as PET or PETE (Figure 2). It is a type of thermoplastic polymer, vulgarly plastic, which belongs to the so-called polyesters, and is obtained by synthesis from petroleum. It is harmless, very resistant and lightweight and has multiple applications (Figure 3). Counting only bottles of PET for refreshing beverages, 1 million of them per minute are sold in the world. It is a recyclable material (see Pet bottle recycling in Wikipedia) but very resistant to biodegradation. In nature it can last some hundreds of years.

F2 PET molecular structure

Figure 2. PET, polyethylene terephthalate.

 

F3 pet uses www.technologystudent.com

Figure 3. Several applications of PET (From http://www.technologystudent.com).

 

PET is “eaten” by Ideonella sakaiensis

I. sakaiensis (Figure 4) are bacteria with rod shape, gram-negative, non esporulate aerobic heterotrophic, mobile with a flagellum, and catalase (+) and oxidase (+) (Tanasupawat et al 2016). They grow at neutral pH and are mesophilic, with optimum at 30-37°C. They belong to the phylogenetic group of betaproteobacteria, which include, besides many others, the known Neisseria (gonorrhoea and meningitis) and the nitrifying Nitrosomonas.

F4 Ideonella-sakaiensis falsecolorSEM Yoshida S

Figure 4. Scanning electron microscope images (false colour) of Ideonella sakaiensis cells grown on PET film for 60 h (From Yoshida et al 2016).

 

The 201-F6 strain, the first of the new species I. sakaiensis, was isolated from a landfill and identified in 2016 by a Japanese group of the Kyoto Institute of Technology that looked for bacteria using plastic as carbon source, from samples of remains of PET bottles (Yoshida et al 2016). They saw that these bacteria adhere to a low-grade PET film and can degrade it, by means of two enzymes characterized by these authors: a PETase and a MHETase, which produce terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol acid (Figure 5), which are benign environmental substances and that the bacteria can be metabolized. A colony of I. sakaiensis completely degraded a low-grade PET bottle in 6 weeks. High-grade PET products need to be heated to weaken them before the bacteria can degrade them. This is the first bacterium found as a PET degrader, and uses it as the only carbon source and energy source. Since PET has existed only for 70 years, these bacteria should have evolved in this short period until being able to degrade PET in a few weeks, instead of hundreds of years in nature (Sampedro 2016).

F5 Yoshida fig 3 right

Figure 5. Predicted metabolic pathway of PET degradation by I. sakaiensis: extracellular PETase hydrolyses PET giving monohydroxyethyl terephthalic (MHET) and terephthalic acid (TPA). MHETase hydrolyses MHET to TPA and ethylene glycol (EG). The TPA is incorporated through a specific transporter (TPATP) and is catabolized to cyclohexadiene and this to protocatechuic acid (PCA) by the DCDDH. Finally, the PCA ring is cut by a PCA 3.4 dioxygenase with oxygen, as known for degradation of phenolic compounds and other xenobiotics. The numbers in parentheses are the ORF of the corresponding genes (From Yoshida et al 2016).

 

Previously, only some tropical microfungi (Fusarium solani) were known to degrade PET, and they also excreted esterases. In this case, Fusarium would be used to modify the polyester fabric, to achieve more hydrophilic and easier to work (Nimchua et al 2008). It is important to remember the structural similarity of synthetic PET fabrics (Figure 3) to those of natural fibre such as cotton, since these contain cutin, which is a polyester, a waxy polymer from the external parts of the plants. Therefore, the enzymes of Fusarium or Ideonella must be relatively similar to those that were already in nature long before the plastics were invented.

 

Recent genetic improvement of the enzyme PETase of Ideonella sakaiensis

In order to better understand the function and specificity of the PETase, a group of American and British researchers have recently characterized the structure of this enzyme (Austin et al 2018), mainly by high resolution X-ray crystallography, comparing it with a homologous cutinase obtained from actinobacteria Thermobifida fusca. The main differences between the two have been a greater polarization in the surface of the PETase (pI 9.6) than in the cutinase (pI 6.3), and on the other hand (Figure 6), a greater width of the active-site cleft in the case of PETase of I. sakaiensis. The cleft widening would be related with an easy accommodation of aromatic polyesters such as PET.

F6 austin fig 2 modif

Figure 6. Compared structures (left) of the PETase of I. sakaiensis (above) and the cutinase of actinobacterium Thermobifida fusca (below), obtained by high resolution X-ray crystallography (0.92 Å). The active-site cleft is marked with a red dotted circle. Details (right) of the active site with different cleft widths in the PETase of I. sakaiensis (above) and the cutinase of T. fusca (below) are shown. (From Austin et al 2018).

 

Hypothesizing that the structure of the active site of the PETase would have resulted from a similar cutinase in an environment with PET, Austin et al (2018) proceeded to make mutations in the PETase active-site to make it more similar to cutinase and obtained a double mutant S238F/W159H which theoretically would make the entry of the active site closer (Figure 6). But their surprise was capital when they saw that the mutant degraded the PET better (an improvement of 20%), with an erosion of the PET film (Figure 7 C) even greater than the original PETase (Figure 7B). The explanation was that mutant changes in amino acid residues favoured PET intake in the active site, despite making a closest cleft (Austin et al 2018).

F7 austin fig 3 modif

Figure 7. Scanning electronic microscopy images of a piece of PET without microorganisms (A), after incubating 96 h with PETase of the I. sakaiensis 201-F6 (B), and with PETase of the double-mutant S238F/W159H (C) (From Austin et al 2018).

 

In addition, these authors have shown that this PETase degrades also other similar semi aromatic polyesters, such as polyethylene-2,5-furonicarboxylate (PEF), and therefore this enzyme can be considered an aromatic polyesterase, but it does not degrade aliphatic ones.

The conclusion of their work is that protein engineering is feasible in order to improve the performance of PETase and that we must continue to deepen in the knowledge of their relationships between structure and activity for the biodegradation of synthetic polyesters (Austin et al 2018).

 

Other plastic-eating microbes ?

The discovery of I. sakaiensis has been very important for the possibility of establishing a rapid recycling process for PET, but it is not the first organism that has been found as plastic consumer. By the way, we can see the formulas of the main plastics derived from petroleum in Figure 8.

F8 Shah 2008 Fig 1

Figure 8. Formulas of the most common petroleum plastics: polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET or PETE) and polyurethane (PU) (From Shah et al 2008).

 

Reviewing the bibliography, we see that many cases of plastic degrading microorganisms have been described (Shah et al 2008), especially polyethylene, polyurethane and PVC: various PseudomonasRhodococcus and Comamonas among bacteria, and some Penicillium, Fusarium and Aspergillus between fungi.

Among the polyurethane consumers, mushrooms are highlighted (Howard 2002), and especially the plants endophyte Pestalotiopsis microspora, which can use polyurethane as the only source of carbon (Russell et al 2011).

On the other hand, the ability of the mealworms, the larval forma of the darkling beetle Tenebrio molitor, to chew and degrade the polystyrene foam is well known (Yang et al 2015). Fed only with the PS, these larvae degrade it completely in relatively short periods. As expected, the degradation of the PS is carried out by the intestinal bacteria of the animal (Figure 9). It has been demonstrated because degradation stops when administering antibiotics to the larva (Yang et al 2015). One of the isolated bacteria that has been shown to degrade PS is Exiguobacterium, from Bacillales group, but it is not the only one. In fact, when performing studies of metagenomics from gut of larvae eating PS, a large variety of bacteria have been found, and these vary depending on the kind of plastic, since the degradation of polyethylene has also been seen. Some of the bacteria with DNA found as predominant would be the enterobacteria Citrobacter and Kosakonia. It seems that the intestinal microbiota of Tenebrio is modified and adapted to the different ingested plastics (Brandon et al 2018).

F9 fig Abs Yang 2015 2

Figure 9. Biodegradation of polystyrene by the intestinal bacteria of Tenebrio, the mealworm (Yang et al 2015).

 

Finally, as we see the microbial biodegradation of non-biodegradable or recalcitrant plastics should not surprise us, since on the one hand, there are natural “plastics” such as polyhydroxybutyrate or polylactic acid that are easily degradable (Shah et in 2008), and on the other hand the adaptive capacity of the microorganisms to be able to break the most recalcitrant chemical bonds is very large. Microbes evolve rapidly, and acquire better strategies to break the plastics made by humans (Patel 2018). We have seen in this case the degradation of PET, which in less than 70 years some microbes have already found a way to take advantage of it.

The problem is that we are generating too much plastic waste in no time and the microorganisms have not had time yet to degrade them. It is clear that we will have to help our microbial partners, not generating more degrading polymers, and recycling and degrading them, by using these same degrading microbes, among other ways.

Bibliography

Austin HP et al (2018) Characterization and engineering of a plastic-degrading aromatic polyesterase. Proc Nat Acad Sci 115, 19, E4350-E4357

Brandon AM et al (2018) Biodegradation of Polyethylene and Plastic Mixtures in Mealworms (Larvae of Tenebrio molitor) and Effects on the Gut Microbiome. Environ Sci Technol 52, 6526-6533

Griggs MB (2017 april 24) These caterpillars chow down on plastic bags. Popular Science. http://www.popsci.com

Howard GT (2002) Biodegradation of polyurethane: a review. Int Biodeterior Biodegrad 42, 213-220

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pacific_garbage_patch

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PET_bottle_recycling

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyethylene_terephthalate

Patel NV (2018 april 17) Scientists stumbled upon a plastic-eating bacterium – then accidentally made it stronger. Popular Science. http://www.popsci.com

Russell JR et al (2011) Biodegradation of polyester polyurethane by endophytic fungi. Appl Environ Microbiol 77, 17, 6076-6084

Sampedro J (2016 marzo 10) Descubierta una bacteria capaz de comerse un plástico muy común. El País

Shah AA et al (2008) Biological degradation of plastics: a comprehensive review. Biotechnol Adv 26, 246-265

Tanasupawat et al (2016) Ideonella sakaiensissp. nov., isolated from a microbial consortium that degrades poly(ethylene terephtalate). Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 66, 2813-2818

Yang et al (2015) Biodegradation and mineralization of polystyrene by plastic-eating mealworms: Part 2. Role of gut microorganisms. Environ Sci Technol 49, 12087-12093

Yoshida et al (2016) A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate). Science 351,1196–1199

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About Albert Bordons

Professor at "Universitat Rovira i Virgili" in Tarragona. Born in Barcelona 1951. Scientific areas: microbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology, oenology. I like: nature, biological sciences, photography, mountains, ... Languages: catalan (first one), spanish, french, english and some italian.

Posted on 25/12/2018, in Bacteria, Biotechnology, Environment, Evolution, Genetics and molecular biology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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